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"TMC" Journals


You have reached "THE  MUSHROOM  CULTURE", Journal of Mushroom Cultivation - OnLine.  This page is supported by donations.  If you have benefited from visiting here, and would like to see other people benefit like you have, please make a donation to FMRC, POB 18105, Pensacola, FL 32523 in any amount.  Without your help, this public service cannot continue.  These are Electronic Issues and do not have the photographs that the Hard Copy Issues have.  You must subscribe to receive Original Issues.  Subscription information is within the Journals.  slp/fmrc

 Some words my run on into each other due to transfer from word document unto this site.

#105 “TMC” Copyright 2015    

ISSN: 1078-4314

For January 2015                            $15.00

                                     

              The Journal of Mushroom Cultivation (TMC)

     The Official Mushroom Journal for the “Independent

               Mushroom Grower’s Network” (IMGN)

                 THE  MUSHROOM  CULTURE

To learn more about IMGN, see www.mushroomsfmrc.com/gpage2.html, or write to FMRC to get complete information on this old and unique mushroom association…many valuable benefits.

___ This is a "RESTRICTED" Issue.  It contains all spore prints and photographs.

___  This is a "NON-RESTRICTED" Issue.  It contains no mushroom spore prints.

___  This is a "REPRINT"/"Photo Copy" Issue.  It may not contain prints or pictures.  Published by:          Florida Mycology Research Center (FMRC)

P.O. Box 18105, Pensacola, FL  32523-8105

1.850.327.4378      FloridaMycology@cs.com

www.mushroomsfmrc.com

EDITORS:          You the reader

                   Over 7,000 IMGN Members 

          Marshall E. Deutsch:  Articles Taken from "The Bulletin Of

                                    The Boston Mycological Club” and other recent references                                

                                to fungi encountered during the editor’s quotidian activities

                  Cooking Editor: Robin Arnold

                  Chief Editor:  Stephen L. Peele, Curator FMRC

 

 

It is official from the USDA:  The 2013/2014 USA Mushroom Cash Crop was over $1 Billion!!!  There were only 283 registered growers!!!  Maybe you should check out “IMGN” and start getting your share!

http://www.mushroomsfmrc.com/gpage2.html

 

The world’s only and longest running color Mushroom Journal (Since 1984) that comes with actual “Live Mushroom Spore Print Samples” affixed inside (held safe inside a small sealed plastic envelope).    

                                                   C O N T E N T S

 

TMC Journal Subscription and other Journal Information............................01

Phishing and Scam Information...................................................................02

Mycology In The Media................................................................................04

     Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, the fungus which infects amphibians

     through their skin....................................................................................04

     The opposite relationship between a drug and a fungus........................04

     Using mushroom mycelium to grow packaging materials.......................04

     Blocking biofilms.....................................................................................04

     Fruit Flies................................................................................................05

     Bat Fungus.............................................................................................05

     Armillaria gallica.....................................................................................05

     Aspergillus flavus and Liver Cancer.......................................................05

     World's Largest Amanita Collection........................................................05

Mushroom Quiz...........................................................................................05

Culture Flask....Is this your last Issue?........................................................06

FREE Mushroom Spore Print Sample Amanita muscaria SOO81..............06

Color Photograph of Amanita phalloides.....................................................07

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                    aa

 

 

 

 

 

Mushroom Journal Subscriptions:  If you would like to order a subscription to “THE MUSHROOM CULTURE”, you may send request and payment of $30.00 made out to FMRC, POB 18105, Pensacola, FL. 32523, for one year. 

Copyright Information: This Journal is Copyrighted under International Law, and all said laws apply.  Any material that finds its way into this Journal, and it has already been copyrighted elsewhere, retains original Copyright.  Authors and photographers who submit material in this Journal are not restricted from using their work, or the sale thereof.  Persons may reprint or transmit this document, only in its complete and original form.  No parts, articles, photographs, or any other partial pieces may be removed from this document.  If you have any questions about reprinting or retransmitting, call 1.850.327.4378 and ask for Stephen L. Peele.  Copies of this document can be given away freely for academic or information purposes.  Any sale, placement, or display in any media that involves the transfer of money, of document, or parts of, is a violation of Copyright.  Authors of articles and emails are solely responsible for their contents and may not represent the views or opinions of FMRC.  
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Subscriptions:   The electronic version of "The Mushroom Culture" Electronica, The Journal of Mushroom Cultivation (TMC) can be read freely at www.mushroomsfmrc.com under “TMC Journals”.  The current Issue will be posted 2 to 3 weeks after the Hard Copies are mailed out to subscribers.   "The Mushroom Culture" physical issue (Hard Copy) that contains actual spore print samples and color photographs, that is mailed to you in a thick plain brown envelope, has the following subscription rates:  One year’s subscription $30.00 (outside the USA  $50.00), Two year’s subscription $50.00 (outside the USA  $90.00), Three year’s subscription $70.00 (outside the USA $130.00).  "Lifetime" subscription is $1,000.00 (outside the USA $2,000.00).  College, University, and other educational library requests may subscribe "Lifetime" for $750.00 (outside the USA $1,750.00). 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Scheduling Dispatch Of This Journal:  This Journal's "Hard Copy" is mailed thru the second week of the Issue's Publication month/date.  This is usually the first Monday of the said month.  Because games and prizes offered in this Journal are restricted to postal mail only, the Electronic Issue is not released until 2 to 3 weeks after the postal mailing of the "Hard Copy".  This is done to prevent unfair advantage if both were released at the same time.  To view the Electronic Issue, go to www.mushroomsfmrc.com then, click on “TMC Journals”.  The FREE Download is made available by donations.  To help keep this mycological free service available to all, you may send your donation in any amount to FMRC, POB 18105, Pensacola, FL 32523.  TMC is a quarterly publication, 4 times a year.  Because many articles are copy/pasted from emails, spelling and grammar errors may exist.  They are left “as is” to show proof of original document. 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
How Many Issues Do I have left on my "TMC" Hard Copy Subscription?  Check the number right after your first name or above the business address on the mailing label affixed to the brown envelope your Journal arrives in.  This is how many issues are left on your current subscription.  Also see "Culture Flask":  If your culture flask has a RED Contaminant in it...this is your last issue!  Please renew.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Know The Mushroom Laws In Your Area:  Some readers who receive this Journal live in areas where no mushroom laws exist.  Others, like those in the USA, must be aware of laws that forbid the possession and cultivation of mushrooms that contain controlled substances.  Psilocybe cubensis is an example of an illegal mushroom in the USA.  As articles are done on an International basis, always keep in mind the laws on these said type mushrooms in your own specific area.  Questions?  Check with the local law from a pay phone.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mushroom Identification over the Phone
a public service provided by FMRC to Poison Control Centers and Emergency Rooms all over the world.  Since 1972, the Florida Mycology Research Center has offered this free service 24 hours a day to all Poison Control Centers and Emergency Rooms.  Please take the time to contact your local Poison Control Center or local hospital and make sure they are aware of this service.  Many times, the identification of a mushroom involved in a mushroom poisoning can mean the correct treatment…the wrong treatment could be bad for the victim.  Call them and give our "Mushroom ID" phone number…1-850-327-4378. 

                  #105 TMC January 2015    Page 01  Copyrighted Material

 

                                Phishing and Scam Emails

                                                           Advice from AOL

Phishing emails often use official-looking logos and layouts and sometimes link to very real-looking forms. The people behind these scams are looking for passwords, banking information, Social Security number, mother's maiden name, date of birth and more. They can use this to steal your identity and assets or open credit card accounts in your name.

Typically phishing emails contain a link to click or a file to download. Don't click any links. Don't download any files!

When you think someone's trying to trick you, click Forward and forward it to us at this address: aol_phish@abuse.aol.com

Email scams are tough to weed out. Nevertheless, almost all of them contain clues that will help you figure out that these are scam emails. You just have to know what to look for.


Top 5 clues to spot an email scam:

1. Check the spelling

Scammers are notorious for their lack of basic spelling and grammar skills. Look out for misspelled words and incomplete or awkwardly written sentences in the email. An email that is supposedly from a reputable and well-known organization will not misspell the name of the organization. For example, one email scam aimed at Facebook users spelled the name of the site with a lowercase F ("facebook").

2. Check who signed it

An email from a legitimate business will always be signed with a person's name and contact information. If an email signs off with something vague, such as "Customer Support," be wary.

3. DOES THE EMAIL SCREAM AT YOU IN ALL CAPS or have lots of !!!!!! at the end?

Beware of emails that try to get your attention by using all capital letters, especially in the subject line, or that try to scare you with lots of exclamation marks. Using all caps has long been viewed as online shouting, which just isn't done. The authors of scam emails tend to write over-the-top and very emotional content. Also, keep an eye out for dire warnings, such as "Urgent!" or "Danger!"

4. The email has an executable attachment

Never download an attachment unless you are sure it's legitimate. A favorite ploy of scammers is to send emails that look like someone you know sent it to you. Don't be fooled by the sender's name. Always verify that the attached file does not contain a virus. You can do this by running a scan or checking with the sender whether it is a legitimate email.

 

                         #105 TMC January 2015    Page 02  Copyrighted Material

 

5. The email has a link to a Web site

As more people now know that they shouldn't download attachments from strangers, scammers have become smarter. Instead of attaching a file, they include a clickable link to a Web site, where you might be asked to provide personal information. For example, you might receive an email that appears to be from your bank offering you a very low interest rate on a mortgage or home equity loan. If you click on the link, it could ask your name, bank account number and online banking password to get onto the site. Don't ever provide this information if you have reached the site by clicking a link in an email.

One final word of advice: Never, ever respond to a spam email. By doing so, you confirm that your email account is active, and you'll likely be flooded with more spam.

Check out our other help articles if you feel that you have been a victim of a phishing email, would like to report suspicious emails or would like more information about phishing and scam emails or links.

We look forward to continuing to provide you with the best online experience possible.  Remember, you can always reach us by emailing TOSGeneral@aol.com.

Sincerely,
AOL Community


 

--- Original Message ---
From: FloridaMycology@cs.com
Received: 12/1/14 8:32:06 PM EET
To: callactionteam@cs.com
Subject: Scam Letters


I have been receiving scam emails about how my email box is jammed and I need to click on an url that is provided.  I knew these were scams.  Never did click, not even on the compuserve ones.  But over the last few days, I have received emails saying the same thing but the "from" email address has compuserve in it.  Hope this is the right place to send this.  If not, please forward it to where it needs to go ......  Here is the email:  Two came from the following email addresses  rsmcgill@aol.com and jpsusag@cs.com  Thank You, Stephen L. Peele, Curator FMRC....floridamycology@cs.com
Subj: CompuServe mail storage
Date: 11/27/2014 9:07:27 AM Central Standard Time
From: 104145.2065@compuserve.com
To: floridamycology@cs.com
Your mailbox has exceeded the storage limit is 1 GB, which is defined by the administrator, are running at 99.8 gigabytes, you can not send or receive new messages until you re-validate your mailbox.

To renew the mailbox,

click link below: click here

Thank you!        
#105 TMC January 2015    Page 03  Copyrighted Material
Web mail system administrator!
WARNING! Protect your privacy. Logout when you are done and completely
exit your browser.

 

From S.L. Peele…….once again, never click on anything like this.  It will only mean troubles.

                                              Mycology in the Media

Marshall EDeutsch

                              Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN) for July 28 discusses Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, the fungus which infects amphibians through their skin. The fungus defeats the immune system of frogs by unleashing a chemical which goads the frogs’ lymphocytes into apoptosis, or cellular suicide. And the only reference to fungi in The New Yorker for August 25 also depicts them as bad guys; an article about a crusade against genetically modified crops contains a single reference to fungi by mentioning black sigatoka as attacking Africa’s “most important crops [and being] in many instances every bit as deadly as H.I.V. and TB.” And a letter in The New England Journal of Medicine for August 28 piles it on by noting that “reports have documented the frequent contamination of marijuana with fungal organisms and the [consequent] potential for severe complications, including death.”

The opposite relationship between a drug and a fungus is being fostered at Stanford University according to New Scientist for 30 August. There researchers are have used genetically engineered yeasts to build an opiate precursor molecule and have engineered yeasts to synthesize finished drugs from another type of precursor molecule.

                               

An ungrammatical headline (“A fungi’s deadly tactics”) makes us be a bit leery about citing the contribution of THE WEEK for September 5 to this column, but here goes: Scientists in Brazil wondered why a fungus which infects carpenter ants did so before the infected ant returned to the nest where it could infect the whole colony. They found that an infected ant was quickly removed from the nest when placed there by the scientists, but if left alone, the infected ant would climb a tree, latch onto the underside of a leaf and, upon death, sprout a long stalk which rained down spores on other ants on the forest floor below.

               

As far as I know, we can get along well without carpenter ants, but coffee is another matter, and Scientfic American for October points out in a discussion of the problems faced in coffee production that “Fungi such as Hemileia vastatrix (coffee rust) and Colleotrichum kahawae have devastated crops in Central America and Ethiopia, respectively.”

               

Using mushroom mycelium to grow packaging materials in place is discussed in C&EN for October 6, but this time the drawbacks which I have previously brought up are mentioned. The October 20 issue of the same publication draws our interest with a reference to Eastern Filbert Blight which makes it hard to grow hazelnuts in the U.S. and is being fought in the U.S. by an effort to bring blight-resistant trees here.

               

Science for 31 October describes fungal threats facing salamanders. We learn that globally populations of amphibians have been severely affected by infection with Batrachocytrium dendrobatidis, and are now threatened by B. salamandrivorans which has migrated from Asia to Europe, where it is killing endangered salamanders and threatens to continue on to North America and endangers Western Palearctic salamanders.

               

In C&EN for November 17, we learn of a new use for fungi. Scientists studying chemicals which block biofilms, such as those produced by Candida albicans, found that when they grew the soil fungus Bionectria ochroleuca on Cheerios instead of their usual agar medium they produced more, and more kinds of bionectriols, which are compounds that prevent both growth and biofilm formation of C. albicans.

         

                #105 TMC January 2015    Page 04  Copyrighted Material

 

      

Sierra for November/December draws our interest with an article on the four best foods to forage, and illustrates the category “fungi” with a photograph of enoki (The discussion is of foraging, but the illustration is not of Flammulina velutipes as seen in the wild.) and some comments on cookery by Eugenia Bone.

               

If you’ve grown mushrooms at home, you’ve probably been plagued by fruit flies and C&EN for November 10 points out that yeast cultures also attract Drosophila melanogaster. The article describes a study which showed that yeasts emitting compounds with fruity aromas attracted more flies and that this aided in spreading the yeasts.

               

The Boston Globe for November 17 contains an interesting article which describes and illustrates the techniques used by biologists to study white nose syndrome in bats in order to understand what they can do to protect the bats.

One of the mysteries presented to scientists by some extremely large and homogeneous growths of Armillaria gallica is why these growths can become so large without mutations causing changes in parts of them. Science for 21 November explains how this is so because the cells on the growth front are relatively free of mutations compared to cells deeper within the growth. In the same issue is an article discussing the viruses, bacteria and fungi which live on normal human skin and defend it from harmful organisms. Although there is considerable variety among the viruses and bacteria, Malassezia constitute the overwhelming fungal component. (Puzzled? Malassezia is the current name for Pityrosporum.)

 

Britt Bunyard calls our attention to an article in Nature for 4 December, wherein is discussed the global threat presented by aflatoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus. The toxin causes liver cancer.

 

Finally, we note that Scientific American for December devotes a two-page spread to honoring Rodham E. Tulloss, whose converted garage contains “One of the world’s largest and most diverse collections of amanitas—the group of fungi that includes death caps, destroying angels and the polka –dotted mushrooms of Super Mario renown…”.       

 

 

                            * * *

 

Marshall E. Deutsch

                                 --------------------------------------------

                  MUSHROOM QUIZ  "MQ"
Mushroom Quiz ("MQ") is featured in each edition of this Journal.  If you know the answer, write it down and mail it in.  No phone calls.  No E-mail.  No FAX.  Your entry must be mailed by 1st Class U.S. Mail only (Overseas and Out Of Country can use Airmail).  The first letter that is opened and has the correct answer WINS. 
What do you win?  An entire year’s subscription to this Journal…..FREE!  Your name will be posted with the correct answer in the following edition (unless you state "Not to publish your name").  So, come on and impress your mushroom friends with your knowledge.  Send your entry to FMRC, "MQ", POB 18105, Pensacola, FL 32523.

Last Issue’s "MQ" for #104 "TMC": What is Aculeate?

Last Issue’s Answer:  Slender and sharp pointed

Winner with Correct “MQ” Answer:  Abby Colean

"MQ" For This Issue #105:  What is Concinnous? 

                            -------------------------------------------------------------

 

                       #105 TMC January 2015    Page 05  Copyrighted Material

 

 CONGRATULATIONS TO THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE
Because of your input to this issue of "TMC", you are awarded a year’s free subscription.  We all thank you for your very helpful input: FREE spore samples by Sidney, and Abby Colean for correct "MQ". Answer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CULTURE  FLASK…….. Is this your last Issue on Subscription?            

                                                                

For Physical "TMC" HARD COPY Subscriptions That Contain Spore Samples
IF YOUR CULTURE FLASK HAS A "RED" CONTAMINANT IN IT,

THIS IS YOUR LAST ISSUE!  Send $30 to renew your subscription ($50 US Dollars for Out Of Country), for another year's subscription.  The "RED" contaminant is your only reminder, other than your mailing label saying "00" issues left after your first name.  As we value your support and interests, please send payment now while it is on your mind.  This way, "TMC" can continue and you will never miss an issue.  After all, it is your Journal.

                                 -----------------------------------------

 

 

Mushroom Spore Print sample For #105 TMC January 2015                                                          "THE MUSHROOM CULTURE"  
Amanita muscaria
EDIBILITY –  Poisonous.  For identification purposes.        FMRC’s Catalog Number ………………………#SOO81

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

             #105 TMC January 2015    Page 06  Copyrighted Material

 

 

 

                               The Journal Of Mushroom Cultivation (TMC)
       
Color photograph for #105, "THE MUSHROOM CULTURE"
                                                      January 2015                                   

                                   Photograph Copyrighted by FMRC 

                              Remember what this mushroom looks like!

                                                      It is Deadly!

 

                       

 

                                                Amanita phalloides

                       #105 TMC January 2015    Page 07  Copyrighted Material

    

                      Florida  Mycology  Research  Center (FMRC)

                         POB 18105, Pensacola, FL 32523 USA

 

 

This copy belongs to:  _____________________________

 

 

 

Please follow the indicated routing and return:

 

  Mycology Department

  Botany Department

  Biology Department

  Science & Mathematics Department

  Research & Development

  Purchasing

  Library

  Other_________________________________________

  To the desk of:__________________________________

 

 

#104 “TMC” Copyright 2014    

ISSN: 1078-4314

For October 2014                            $15.00

                                     

              The Journal of Mushroom Cultivation (TMC)

     The Official Mushroom Journal for the “Independent

               Mushroom Grower’s Network” (IMGN)

                 THE  MUSHROOM  CULTURE

To learn more about IMGN, see www.mushroomsfmrc.com/gpage2.html, or write to FMRC to get complete information on this old and unique mushroom association…many valuable benefits.

___ This is a "RESTRICTED" Issue.  It contains all spore prints and photographs.

___  This is a "NON-RESTRICTED" Issue.  It contains no mushroom spore prints.

___  This is a "REPRINT"/"Photo Copy" Issue.  It may not contain prints or pictures.  Published by:          Florida Mycology Research Center (FMRC)

P.O. Box 18105, Pensacola, FL  32523-8105

1.850.327.4378      FloridaMycology@cs.com

www.mushroomsfmrc.com

EDITORS:          You the reader

                   Over 7,000 IMGN Members 

          Marshall E. Deutsch:  Articles Taken from "The Bulletin Of

                                    The Boston Mycological Club” and other recent references                                

                                to fungi encountered during the editor’s quotidian activities

                  Cooking Editor: Robin Arnold

                  Chief Editor:  Stephen L. Peele, Curator FMRC

 

 

It is official from the USDA:  The 2011/2012 USA Mushroom Cash Crop was over $1 Billion!!!  There were only 279 registered growers!!!  Maybe you should check out “IMGN” and start getting your share!

http://www.mushroomsfmrc.com/gpage2.html

 

The world’s only and longest running color Mushroom Journal (Since 1984) that comes with actual “Live Mushroom Spore Print Samples” affixed inside (held safe inside a small sealed plastic envelope).    

                                                   C O N T E N T S

 

Mushroom Journal Subscription and Other Journal Information………..01

Mycology In The Media………………………………………………………02

   Vaccination of frogs to prevent chytrid fungus………………..………………03

   Red fescue grass attacked by fungus……………………….…………..03

Mushroom Quiz………………………………………………………………04

FREE Journal Subscriptions Awarded…………………………………….04

FREE Mushroom Spore Print Sample Macrocybe titan……………04

Macrocybe titan Information……………………………………….……….04

CULTURE  FLASK…….. Is this your last Issue on Subscription? 05

Color Photograph Panus conchatus…………………………………06

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                             aa

 

 

 

Mushroom Journal Subscriptions:  If you would like to order a subscription to “THE MUSHROOM CULTURE”, you may send request and payment of $30.00 made out to FMRC, POB 18105, Pensacola, FL. 32523, for one year. 

Copyright Information: This Journal is Copyrighted under International Law, and all said laws apply.  Any material that finds its way into this Journal, and it has already been copyrighted elsewhere, retains original Copyright.  Authors and photographers who submit material in this Journal are not restricted from using their work, or the sale thereof.  Persons may reprint or transmit this document, only in its complete and original form.  No parts, articles, photographs, or any other partial pieces may be removed from this document.  If you have any questions about reprinting or retransmitting, call 1.850.327.4378 and ask for Stephen L. Peele.  Copies of this document can be given away freely for academic or information purposes.  Any sale, placement, or display in any media that involves the transfer of money, of document, or parts of, is a violation of Copyright.  Authors of articles and emails are solely responsible for their contents and may not represent the views or opinions of FMRC.  
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Subscriptions:   The electronic version of "The Mushroom Culture" Electronica, The Journal of Mushroom Cultivation (TMC) can be read freely at www.mushroomsfmrc.com under “TMC Journals”.  The current Issue will be posted 2 to 3 weeks after the Hard Copies are mailed out to subscribers.   "The Mushroom Culture" physical issue (Hard Copy) that contains actual spore print samples and color photographs, that is mailed to you in a thick plain brown envelope, has the following subscription rates:  One year’s subscription $30.00 (outside the USA  $50.00), Two year’s subscription $50.00 (outside the USA  $90.00), Three year’s subscription $70.00 (outside the USA $130.00).  "Lifetime" subscription is $1,000.00 (outside the USA $2,000.00).  College, University, and other educational library requests may subscribe "Lifetime" for $750.00 (outside the USA $1,750.00). 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Scheduling Dispatch Of This Journal:  This Journal's "Hard Copy" is mailed thru the second week of the Issue's Publication month/date.  This is usually the first Monday of the said month.  Because games and prizes offered in this Journal are restricted to postal mail only, the Electronic Issue is not released until 2 to 3 weeks after the postal mailing of the "Hard Copy".  This is done to prevent unfair advantage if both were released at the same time.  To view the Electronic Issue, go to www.mushroomsfmrc.com then, click on “TMC Journals”.  The FREE Download is made available by donations.  To help keep this mycological free service available to all, you may send your donation in any amount to FMRC, POB 18105, Pensacola, FL 32523.  TMC is a quarterly publication, 4 times a year.  Because many articles are copy/pasted from emails, spelling and grammar errors may exist.  They are left “as is” to show proof of original document. 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
How Many Issues Do I have left on my "TMC" Hard Copy Subscription?  Check the number right after your first name or above the business address on the mailing label affixed to the brown envelope your Journal arrives in.  This is how many issues are left on your current subscription.  Also see "Culture Flask":  If your culture flask has a RED Contaminant in it...this is your last issue!  Please renew.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Know The Mushroom Laws In Your Area:  Some readers who receive this Journal live in areas where no mushroom laws exist.  Others, like those in the USA, must be aware of laws that forbid the possession and cultivation of mushrooms that contain controlled substances.  Psilocybe cubensis is an example of an illegal mushroom in the USA.  As articles are done on an International basis, always keep in mind the laws on these said type mushrooms in your own specific area.  Questions?  Check with the local law from a pay phone.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mushroom Identification over the Phone
a public service provided by FMRC to Poison Control Centers and Emergency Rooms all over the world.  Since 1972, the Florida Mycology Research Center has offered this free service 24 hours a day to all Poison Control Centers and Emergency Rooms.  Please take the time to contact your local Poison Control Center or local hospital and make sure they are aware of this service.  Many times, the identification of a mushroom involved in a mushroom poisoning can mean the correct treatment…the wrong treatment could be bad for the victim.  Call them and give our "Mushroom ID" phone number…1-850-327-4378. 

                  #104 TMC October 2014    Page 01  Copyrighted Material

 

                                                      Mycology in the Media

Marshall E.  Deutsch

 Here are a few quotations from a short story in The New Yorker (TNY) for May 12. Your task is to determine in what country the story takes place:  “Everyone foraged in the forest. . .They filled pillowcases with mushrooms.. . . They stashed pickles  and mushrooms in the cellar and buried the early potatoes. . . and all the mushrooms—from the little slippery Jacks to the ugly milkcaps.. . . We just came up here to take a look at our property and pick up some pickles and mushrooms from our cellar.” The correct answer is the obvious one.

               

Okay, you got that one right, but did you know that, as pointed out in a book review in Science  for 16 May that the oldest living things in the world include “monster mushrooms” and  Arctic lichens?  More educational is the answer to a reader’s question given in New Scientist (NS) for May 17. The reader submitted a photo of “small pebble-like fungi ” dug up in a forest on the west coast of Norway and asked what they were. The answer is so interesting and packed with information that it resists summary, but I’ll try: “The fungus that you have dug up is most likely to be the ascomycete, Elaphomyces granulatus [and] are commonly known as false truffles. 

 

                “Although the fungus isn’t edible for humans, deer eat the thick outer skin but leave the black mass at the centre. These masses are packed with thousands of spores  . . .   

                “They are usually found in deciduous or coniferous woods. . .

                “The fungi aren’t particularly beautiful but they are hardly ever seen. They often grow in symbiosis with spruce trees, forming . . .ectomycorrhizas. . .    

 

Interestingly the fungus can be infected by Cordyceps ophioglossoides. . .This parasitic fungus grows out of the soil around autumn, alerting watchful fungi lovers to the presence of hidden E. granulatus.”

 

                The Boston Globe for May 26 usually reports races in the Sports section, but reported a Dictyostelium race in the Metro section, wherein it  described  “the World Dicty Race,” which took place on microscope slides and was won by a Dutch team.    Surely you recall previous posts on traveling slime molds. And, finally for May, I cite THE WEEK for May 30 , wherein we learn that “Coffee-leaf rust, or roya, has spread across Latin America’s coffee fields, causing a 20% drop in exports since October and threatening up to 500,000 jobs in the coffee growing and exporting industries.”   

               

The Scientist for June explains why hot humid weather can result in the production of barley contaminated with Fusarium graminearum, which in turn may result in the production of beer containing barf-inducing mycotoxins. And, it is pointed out in another article that wheat, which is also attacked by F. graminearum, has Ug99 as its most serious pathogen. (We know Ug99 as a strain of Puccinia graminis.). A third article presents a nicely illustrated page describing “a sampling of the most devastating crop pathogens.”

               

On June 10, the Wayland Town  Crier describes a mushroom walk organized by Wayland Walks and featuring our own Larry Millman and his mycological wisdom. And on 7 June, NS describes the 20-year effort trying to save the American chestnut from extinction by Cryphonectria parasitica by genetically modifying trees. In the same issue, a column makes note of a notice the magazine received from the American Society for Microbiology headed “Bacteria and Fungi from 1500-Year-Old Feces Support Archeological Theories of Caribbean Cultures.” In the next (14 June) issue, a reader expands on this theme, noting that “Fungi are much maligned but live contentedly in our colon, mostly chewing on the carbohydrates passing through,” and in the next issue, coverage of the human fungal complement is extended by a discussion of

            #104 TMC October 2014    Page 02  Copyrighted Material

 

dandruff. Dandruff appears where there are sebaceous glands which “secrete sebum, which lubricates and waterproofs the skin, but also feeds the fungus Malassezia globosa. During a dandruff episode, the population of this fungus can double. It metabolizes triglycerides in sebum. Oleic acid is produced as a by-product and penetrates the topmost layer of the skin. This triggers an inflammatory response in susceptible people, increasing the number of cells that are shed.”

               

In its July issue, The Scientist reports on the atypicality of Cryptococcus neoformans sex. Apparently it is largely homosexual, since one of the mating types occurs in only 0.1% of the population, and two members of the other mating type can mate with each other to produce offspring. You think that’s weird? In Science for 4 July, we learn of apparently successful treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome with psilocybin and, in another article (of course) discovery of a “latent capacity for fungal-algal mutualism” which “establishes a set of experimentally tractable, phylogenetically related, synthetic systems for studying the evolution of symbiosis.”

 

                Back to NS, in whose July 12 issue we learn of how vaccination of frogs with dead Batrochochytrium dendrobatidis protects them from subsequent infection by the live chytrid fungus and, in another article, a possible explanation for the effect of psilocybin reported in the previous paragraph. The activity pattern following administration of the drug “is similar to that seen when someone is dreaming.” (The latter is also noted in THE WEEK for July 25 wherein we also encounter a recipe using red pine mushrooms that had been pickled with caraway seed.) And in NS for 19 July, we discover that one of the problems encountered in growing edible seaweed by aquaculture is that “algae and fungi can form a thick layer on the blades and block sunlight.” 

 

                Red fescue, a grass that grows worldwide is infested with “fungi that make a toxin called ergovaline” according to an article in NS for 26 July, but the article goes on to explain that reindeer or moose saliva deactivates the poison.

 

                Which brings us to Sierra magazine for July/August, which, under the heading: “The Next Big Thing in the future, will mushrooms solve all our problems?” discusses a fungal substitute for styrofoam packaging, the important role played by ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal fungi in storing carbon, and the use of mycoremediation to break down oil and pesticides in waste water.

               

Harper’s Magazine for August, in an article on the end of retirement tells of a man who “had worked at a hot spring in Tonopah, Arizona, to supplement his monthly $590 Social Security check and was planning to join friends in the Pacific Northwest picking morel mushrooms, which he heard fetched ten dollars an ounce,” while Scientific American for August tells us that a photograph submitted as a puzzle in a previous issue is probably a shot of a Penicillium mycelium on bread, while elsewhere in the issue Michael Shermer’s column refers to a Scheme to save humanity “by the creation in 2090  of a lichenized fungus that consumes atmospheric carbon dioxide.

                       

                The amazing slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum even farms bacteria according to an interview with Joan Strassmann printed in the September-October issue of American Scientist . Farmer clones carry around bacteria for subsequent digestion, along with “other bacteria, which they use to defend and privatize their food bacteria.”  In the same issue is a review of a book on the science of cheese, a review which you might think would tell a bit about the fungi which help make cheeses, but whose only fungal reference is a note that “1-octen-3-ol and 1-octen-3-one provide the mushroom aroma of surface mold cheeses.”          Marshall E. Deutsch                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              #104 TMC October 2014    Page 03  Copyrighted Material

                                                                                            

                    MUSHROOM QUIZ  "MQ"
Mushroom Quiz ("MQ") is featured in each edition of this Journal.  If you know the answer, write it down and mail it in.  No phone calls.  No E-mail.  No FAX.  Your entry must be mailed by 1st Class U.S. Mail only (Overseas and Out Of Country can use Airmail).  The first letter that is opened and has the correct answer WINS. 
What do you win?  An entire year’s subscription to this Journal…..FREE!  Your name will be posted with the correct answer in the following edition (unless you state "Not to publish your name").  So, come on and impress your mushroom friends with your knowledge.  Send your entry to FMRC, "MQ", POB 18105, Pensacola, FL 32523.

Last Issue’s "MQ" for #103 "TMC": What is Basidioma?

Last Issue’s Answer:  The fruit body of the Basidiomycetes.

Winner with Correct “MQ” Answer:  Jeff Dane

"MQ" For This Issue #104:  Aculeate? 

                            -------------------------------------------------------------

 CONGRATULATIONS TO THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE
Because of your input to this issue of "TMC", you are awarded a year’s free subscription.  We all thank you for your very helpful input: FREE spore samples by Sherry Fischer, Color Photograph by Robin Arnold and Jeff Dane for correct "MQ". Answer.

                                             ----------------------------

        HOW TO WIN A YEAR’S FREE SUBSCRIPTION TO “TMC”

If you see any article about mushrooms, past or present, and you think others may like to read about it, send it in.  If it is used in "TMC", you get the free subscription.  If you find a large stand of a particular species of mushroom, and are able to collect 7 to 10 good full sheets of spore prints (enough to place samples in "TMC"), send them in.  If they are accepted, they will be placed in

"TMC", and you get the free subscription.  If you send anything in that has to do with mushrooms, and it is used (Mail Call letters do not apply), you get the free subscription.  If you do not want your name mentioned, please state so and we will honor your wishes.  Free subscriptions are physical issues with spore print samples and 4" X 6" color photographs.

                                 ------------------------------

Mushroom Spore Print sample For #104 TMC October 2014                                                          "THE MUSHROOM CULTURE"  
Macrocybe titan 
EDIBILITY –  Edible.          FMRC’s Catalog Number ………………………#SO3999

                             --------------------

                  Macrocybe titan information

Probably the largest growing mushroom in North America.  A 20 kilo specimen was found in Mexico.  Caps can be larger than 3 feet across.  If grown in a canning jar (I suggest sterile barley), do not expect really large specimens as the jar will not be big enough to grow enough mycelium to build a really large one.  For large results a good straw bed outside will be needed.  This mushroom also seems to stay free of any bacterial and insect attack.  It also seems connected to the collapse of ant beds.  It is found in grassy areas.  Anyone who would like to order a Mushroom Spore Print Sample (Plus or Minus 10,000 spores) of this mushroom……Write out the species name, give the FMRC Catalog number

                     #104 TMC October 2014    Page 04  Copyrighted Material

 

SO3999, and send $30.00 (a postal money order bought at your local post office is the best method of payment or a Western Union Money Order made out to FMRC, POB 18105, Pensacola, FL 32523 (Do not wire any payment).

                                            -----------------------------------------

 

CULTURE  FLASK…….. Is this your last Issue on Subscription?            

                                                                 

For Physical "TMC" HARD COPY Subscriptions That Contain Spore Samples
IF YOUR CULTURE FLASK HAS A "RED" CONTAMINANT IN IT,

THIS IS YOUR LAST ISSUE!  Send $30 to renew your subscription ($50 US Dollars for Out Of Country), for another year's subscription.  The "RED" contaminant is your only reminder, other than your mailing label saying "00" issues left after your first name.  As we value your support and interests, please send payment now while it is on your mind.  This way, "TMC" can continue and you will never miss an issue.  After all, it is your Journal.

 

          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

              #104 TMC October 2014    Page 05  Copyrighted Material

 

 

 

 

 

                               The Journal Of Mushroom Cultivation (TMC)
       
Color photograph for #104, "THE MUSHROOM CULTURE"
                                                      October 2014                                  

                                   Photograph Copyrighted by FMRC 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

                                                Panus conchatus

 

                                              Sent in by Robin Arnold

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

              #104 TMC October 2014    Page 06  Copyrighted Material

 

 

 

 

 

          

                      Florida  Mycology  Research  Center (FMRC)

                         POB 18105, Pensacola, FL 32523 USA

 

 

This copy belongs to:  _____________________________

 

 

 

Please follow the indicated routing and return:

 

  Mycology Department

  Botany Department

  Biology Department

  Science & Mathematics Department

  Research & Development

  Purchasing

  Library

  Other_________________________________________

  To the desk of:__________________________________

 

 

 

                     #104 TMC October 2014

                                             

 

 

#104 “TMC” Copyright 2014    

ISSN: 1078-4314

For October 2014                            $15.00

                                     

              The Journal of Mushroom Cultivation (TMC)

     The Official Mushroom Journal for the “Independent

               Mushroom Grower’s Network” (IMGN)

                 THE  MUSHROOM  CULTURE

To learn more about IMGN, see www.mushroomsfmrc.com/gpage2.html, or write to FMRC to get complete information on this old and unique mushroom association…many valuable benefits.

___ This is a "RESTRICTED" Issue.  It contains all spore prints and photographs.

___  This is a "NON-RESTRICTED" Issue.  It contains no mushroom spore prints.

___  This is a "REPRINT"/"Photo Copy" Issue.  It may not contain prints or pictures.  Published by:          Florida Mycology Research Center (FMRC)

P.O. Box 18105, Pensacola, FL  32523-8105

1.850.327.4378      FloridaMycology@cs.com

www.mushroomsfmrc.com

EDITORS:          You the reader

                   Over 7,000 IMGN Members 

          Marshall E. Deutsch:  Articles Taken from "The Bulletin Of

                                    The Boston Mycological Club” and other recent references                                

                                to fungi encountered during the editor’s quotidian activities

                  Cooking Editor: Robin Arnold

                  Chief Editor:  Stephen L. Peele, Curator FMRC

 

 

It is official from the USDA:  The 2011/2012 USA Mushroom Cash Crop was over $1 Billion!!!  There were only 279 registered growers!!!  Maybe you should check out “IMGN” and start getting your share!

http://www.mushroomsfmrc.com/gpage2.html

 

The world’s only and longest running color Mushroom Journal (Since 1984) that comes with actual “Live Mushroom Spore Print Samples” affixed inside (held safe inside a small sealed plastic envelope).    

                                                   C O N T E N T S

 

Mushroom Journal Subscription and Other Journal Information………..01

Mycology In The Media………………………………………………………02

   Vaccination of frogs to prevent chytrid fungus………………..………………03

   Red fescue grass attacked by fungus……………………….…………..03

Mushroom Quiz………………………………………………………………04

FREE Journal Subscriptions Awarded…………………………………….04

FREE Mushroom Spore Print Sample Macrocybe titan……………04

Macrocybe titan Information……………………………………….……….04

CULTURE  FLASK…….. Is this your last Issue on Subscription? 05

Color Photograph Panus conchatus…………………………………06

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                             aa

 

 

 

Mushroom Journal Subscriptions:  If you would like to order a subscription to “THE MUSHROOM CULTURE”, you may send request and payment of $30.00 made out to FMRC, POB 18105, Pensacola, FL. 32523, for one year. 

Copyright Information: This Journal is Copyrighted under International Law, and all said laws apply.  Any material that finds its way into this Journal, and it has already been copyrighted elsewhere, retains original Copyright.  Authors and photographers who submit material in this Journal are not restricted from using their work, or the sale thereof.  Persons may reprint or transmit this document, only in its complete and original form.  No parts, articles, photographs, or any other partial pieces may be removed from this document.  If you have any questions about reprinting or retransmitting, call 1.850.327.4378 and ask for Stephen L. Peele.  Copies of this document can be given away freely for academic or information purposes.  Any sale, placement, or display in any media that involves the transfer of money, of document, or parts of, is a violation of Copyright.  Authors of articles and emails are solely responsible for their contents and may not represent the views or opinions of FMRC.  
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Subscriptions:   The electronic version of "The Mushroom Culture" Electronica, The Journal of Mushroom Cultivation (TMC) can be read freely at www.mushroomsfmrc.com under “TMC Journals”.  The current Issue will be posted 2 to 3 weeks after the Hard Copies are mailed out to subscribers.   "The Mushroom Culture" physical issue (Hard Copy) that contains actual spore print samples and color photographs, that is mailed to you in a thick plain brown envelope, has the following subscription rates:  One year’s subscription $30.00 (outside the USA  $50.00), Two year’s subscription $50.00 (outside the USA  $90.00), Three year’s subscription $70.00 (outside the USA $130.00).  "Lifetime" subscription is $1,000.00 (outside the USA $2,000.00).  College, University, and other educational library requests may subscribe "Lifetime" for $750.00 (outside the USA $1,750.00). 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

The Scheduling Dispatch Of This Journal:  This Journal's "Hard Copy" is mailed thru the second week of the Issue's Publication month/date.  This is usually the first Monday of the said month.  Because games and prizes offered in this Journal are restricted to postal mail only, the Electronic Issue is not released until 2 to 3 weeks after the postal mailing of the "Hard Copy".  This is done to prevent unfair advantage if both were released at the same time.  To view the Electronic Issue, go to www.mushroomsfmrc.com then, click on “TMC Journals”.  The FREE Download is made available by donations.  To help keep this mycological free service available to all, you may send your donation in any amount to FMRC, POB 18105, Pensacola, FL 32523.  TMC is a quarterly publication, 4 times a year.  Because many articles are copy/pasted from emails, spelling and grammar errors may exist.  They are left “as is” to show proof of original document. 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
How Many Issues Do I have left on my "TMC" Hard Copy Subscription?  Check the number right after your first name or above the business address on the mailing label affixed to the brown envelope your Journal arrives in.  This is how many issues are left on your current subscription.  Also see "Culture Flask":  If your culture flask has a RED Contaminant in it...this is your last issue!  Please renew.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Know The Mushroom Laws In Your Area:  Some readers who receive this Journal live in areas where no mushroom laws exist.  Others, like those in the USA, must be aware of laws that forbid the possession and cultivation of mushrooms that contain controlled substances.  Psilocybe cubensis is an example of an illegal mushroom in the USA.  As articles are done on an International basis, always keep in mind the laws on these said type mushrooms in your own specific area.  Questions?  Check with the local law from a pay phone.

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mushroom Identification over the Phone
a public service provided by FMRC to Poison Control Centers and Emergency Rooms all over the world.  Since 1972, the Florida Mycology Research Center has offered this free service 24 hours a day to all Poison Control Centers and Emergency Rooms.  Please take the time to contact your local Poison Control Center or local hospital and make sure they are aware of this service.  Many times, the identification of a mushroom involved in a mushroom poisoning can mean the correct treatment…the wrong treatment could be bad for the victim.  Call them and give our "Mushroom ID" phone number…1-850-327-4378. 

                  #104 TMC October 2014    Page 01  Copyrighted Material

 

                                                      Mycology in the Media

Marshall E.  Deutsch

 Here are a few quotations from a short story in The New Yorker (TNY) for May 12. Your task is to determine in what country the story takes place:  “Everyone foraged in the forest. . .They filled pillowcases with mushrooms.. . . They stashed pickles  and mushrooms in the cellar and buried the early potatoes. . . and all the mushrooms—from the little slippery Jacks to the ugly milkcaps.. . . We just came up here to take a look at our property and pick up some pickles and mushrooms from our cellar.” The correct answer is the obvious one.

               

Okay, you got that one right, but did you know that, as pointed out in a book review in Science  for 16 May that the oldest living things in the world include “monster mushrooms” and  Arctic lichens?  More educational is the answer to a reader’s question given in New Scientist (NS) for May 17. The reader submitted a photo of “small pebble-like fungi ” dug up in a forest on the west coast of Norway and asked what they were. The answer is so interesting and packed with information that it resists summary, but I’ll try: “The fungus that you have dug up is most likely to be the ascomycete, Elaphomyces granulatus [and] are commonly known as false truffles. 

 

                “Although the fungus isn’t edible for humans, deer eat the thick outer skin but leave the black mass at the centre. These masses are packed with thousands of spores  . . .   

                “They are usually found in deciduous or coniferous woods. . .

                “The fungi aren’t particularly beautiful but they are hardly ever seen. They often grow in symbiosis with spruce trees, forming . . .ectomycorrhizas. . .    

 

Interestingly the fungus can be infected by Cordyceps ophioglossoides. . .This parasitic fungus grows out of the soil around autumn, alerting watchful fungi lovers to the presence of hidden E. granulatus.”

 

                The Boston Globe for May 26 usually reports races in the Sports section, but reported a Dictyostelium race in the Metro section, wherein it  described  “the World Dicty Race,” which took place on microscope slides and was won by a Dutch team.    Surely you recall previous posts on traveling slime molds. And, finally for May, I cite THE WEEK for May 30 , wherein we learn that “Coffee-leaf rust, or roya, has spread across Latin America’s coffee fields, causing a 20% drop in exports since October and threatening up to 500,000 jobs in the coffee growing and exporting industries.”   

               

The Scientist for June explains why hot humid weather can result in the production of barley contaminated with Fusarium graminearum, which in turn may result in the production of beer containing barf-inducing mycotoxins. And, it is pointed out in another article that wheat, which is also attacked by F. graminearum, has Ug99 as its most serious pathogen. (We know Ug99 as a strain of Puccinia graminis.). A third article presents a nicely illustrated page describing “a sampling of the most devastating crop pathogens.”

               

On June 10, the Wayland Town  Crier describes a mushroom walk organized by Wayland Walks and featuring our own Larry Millman and his mycological wisdom. And on 7 June, NS describes the 20-year effort trying to save the American chestnut from extinction by Cryphonectria parasitica by genetically modifying trees. In the same issue, a column makes note of a notice the magazine received from the American Society for Microbiology headed “Bacteria and Fungi from 1500-Year-Old Feces Support Archeological Theories of Caribbean Cultures.” In the next (14 June) issue, a reader expands on this theme, noting that “Fungi are much maligned but live contentedly in our colon, mostly chewing on the carbohydrates passing through,” and in the next issue, coverage of the human fungal complement is extended by a discussion of

            #104 TMC October 2014    Page 02  Copyrighted Material

 

dandruff. Dandruff appears where there are sebaceous glands which “secrete sebum, which lubricates and waterproofs the skin, but also feeds the fungus Malassezia globosa. During a dandruff episode, the population of this fungus can double. It metabolizes triglycerides in sebum. Oleic acid is produced as a by-product and penetrates the topmost layer of the skin. This triggers an inflammatory response in susceptible people, increasing the number of cells that are shed.”

               

In its July issue, The Scientist reports on the atypicality of Cryptococcus neoformans sex. Apparently it is largely homosexual, since one of the mating types occurs in only 0.1% of the population, and two members of the other mating type can mate with each other to produce offspring. You think that’s weird? In Science for 4 July, we learn of apparently successful treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome with psilocybin and, in another article (of course) discovery of a “latent capacity for fungal-algal mutualism” which “establishes a set of experimentally tractable, phylogenetically related, synthetic systems for studying the evolution of symbiosis.”

 

                Back to NS, in whose July 12 issue we learn of how vaccination of frogs with dead Batrochochytrium dendrobatidis protects them from subsequent infection by the live chytrid fungus and, in another article, a possible explanation for the effect of psilocybin reported in the previous paragraph. The activity pattern following administration of the drug “is similar to that seen when someone is dreaming.” (The latter is also noted in THE WEEK for July 25 wherein we also encounter a recipe using red pine mushrooms that had been pickled with caraway seed.) And in NS for 19 July, we discover that one of the problems encountered in growing edible seaweed by aquaculture is that “algae and fungi can form a thick layer on the blades and block sunlight.” 

 

                Red fescue, a grass that grows worldwide is infested with “fungi that make a toxin called ergovaline” according to an article in NS for 26 July, but the article goes on to explain that reindeer or moose saliva deactivates the poison.

 

                Which brings us to Sierra magazine for July/August, which, under the heading: “The Next Big Thing in the future, will mushrooms solve all our problems?” discusses a fungal substitute for styrofoam packaging, the important role played by ectomycorrhizal and ericoid mycorrhizal fungi in storing carbon, and the use of mycoremediation to break down oil and pesticides in waste water.

               

Harper’s Magazine for August, in an article on the end of retirement tells of a man who “had worked at a hot spring in Tonopah, Arizona, to supplement his monthly $590 Social Security check and was planning to join friends in the Pacific Northwest picking morel mushrooms, which he heard fetched ten dollars an ounce,” while Scientific American for August tells us that a photograph submitted as a puzzle in a previous issue is probably a shot of a Penicillium mycelium on bread, while elsewhere in the issue Michael Shermer’s column refers to a Scheme to save humanity “by the creation in 2090  of a lichenized fungus that consumes atmospheric carbon dioxide.

                       

                The amazing slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum even farms bacteria according to an interview with Joan Strassmann printed in the September-October issue of American Scientist . Farmer clones carry around bacteria for subsequent digestion, along with “other bacteria, which they use to defend and privatize their food bacteria.”  In the same issue is a review of a book on the science of cheese, a review which you might think would tell a bit about the fungi which help make cheeses, but whose only fungal reference is a note that “1-octen-3-ol and 1-octen-3-one provide the mushroom aroma of surface mold cheeses.”          Marshall E. Deutsch                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              #104 TMC October 2014    Page 03  Copyrighted Material

                                                                                            

                    MUSHROOM QUIZ  "MQ"
Mushroom Quiz ("MQ") is featured in each edition of this Journal.  If you know the answer, write it down and mail it in.  No phone calls.  No E-mail.  No FAX.  Your entry must be mailed by 1st Class U.S. Mail only (Overseas and Out Of Country can use Airmail).  The first letter that is opened and has the correct answer WINS. 
What do you win?  An entire year’s subscription to this Journal…..FREE!  Your name will be posted with the correct answer in the following edition (unless you state "Not to publish your name").  So, come on and impress your mushroom friends with your knowledge.  Send your entry to FMRC, "MQ", POB 18105, Pensacola, FL 32523.

Last Issue’s "MQ" for #103 "TMC": What is Basidioma?

Last Issue’s Answer:  The fruit body of the Basidiomycetes.

Winner with Correct “MQ” Answer:  Jeff Dane

"MQ" For This Issue #104:  Aculeate? 

                            -------------------------------------------------------------

 CONGRATULATIONS TO THE FOLLOWING PEOPLE
Because of your input to this issue of "TMC", you are awarded a year’s free subscription.  We all thank you for your very helpful input: FREE spore samples by Sherry Fischer, Color Photograph by Robin Arnold and Jeff Dane for correct "MQ". Answer.

                                             ----------------------------

        HOW TO WIN A YEAR’S FREE SUBSCRIPTION TO “TMC”

If you see any article about mushrooms, past or present, and you think others may like to read about it, send it in.  If it is used in "TMC", you get the free subscription.  If you find a large stand of a particular species of mushroom, and are able to collect 7 to 10 good full sheets of spore prints (enough to place samples in "TMC"), send them in.  If they are accepted, they will be placed in

"TMC", and you get the free subscription.  If you send anything in that has to do with mushrooms, and it is used (Mail Call letters do not apply), you get the free subscription.  If you do not want your name mentioned, please state so and we will honor your wishes.  Free subscriptions are physical issues with spore print samples and 4" X 6" color photographs.

                                 ------------------------------

Mushroom Spore Print sample For #104 TMC October 2014                                                          "THE MUSHROOM CULTURE"  
Macrocybe titan 
EDIBILITY –  Edible.          FMRC’s Catalog Number ………………………#SO3999

                             --------------------

                  Macrocybe titan information

Probably the largest growing mushroom in North America.  A 20 kilo specimen was found in Mexico.  Caps can be larger than 3 feet across.  If grown in a canning jar (I suggest sterile barley), do not expect really large specimens as the jar will not be big enough to grow enough mycelium to build a really large one.  For large results a good straw bed outside will be needed.  This mushroom also seems to stay free of any bacterial and insect attack.  It also seems connected to the collapse of ant beds.  It is found in grassy areas.  Anyone who would like to order a Mushroom Spore Print Sample (Plus or Minus 10,000 spores) of this mushroom……Write out the species name, give the FMRC Catalog number

                     #104 TMC October 2014    Page 04  Copyrighted Material

 

SO3999, and send $30.00 (a postal money order bought at your local post office is the best method of payment or a Western Union Money Order made out to FMRC, POB 18105, Pensacola, FL 32523 (Do not wire any payment).

                                            -----------------------------------------

 

CULTURE  FLASK…….. Is this your last Issue on Subscription?            

                                                                 

For Physical "TMC" HARD COPY Subscriptions That Contain Spore Samples
IF YOUR CULTURE FLASK HAS A "RED" CONTAMINANT IN IT,

THIS IS YOUR LAST ISSUE!  Send $30 to renew your subscription ($50 US Dollars for Out Of Country), for another year's subscription.  The "RED" contaminant is your only reminder, other than your mailing label saying "00" issues left after your first name.  As we value your support and interests, please send payment now while it is on your mind.  This way, "TMC" can continue and you will never miss an issue.  After all, it is your Journal.

 

          

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

              #104 TMC October 2014    Page 05  Copyrighted Material

 

 

 

 

 

                               The Journal Of Mushroom Cultivation (TMC)
       
Color photograph for #104, "THE MUSHROOM CULTURE"
                                                      October 2014                                  

                                   Photograph Copyrighted by FMRC 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

                                                Panus conchatus

 

                                              Sent in by Robin Arnold

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

              #104 TMC October 2014    Page 06  Copyrighted Material

 

 

 

 

 

          

                      Florida  Mycology  Research  Center (FMRC)

                         POB 18105, Pensacola, FL 32523 USA

 

 

This copy belongs to:  _____________________________

 

 

 

Please follow the indicated routing and return:

 

  Mycology Department

  Botany Department

  Biology Department

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                     #104 TMC October 2014

                                             

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                  

 

#102 “TMC” Copyright 2014    

ISSN: 1078-4314

For April 2014                            $15.00

                                     

              The Journal of Mushroom Cultivation (TMC)

     The Official Mushroom Journal for the “Independent

               Mushroom Grower’s Network” (IMGN)

                 THE  MUSHROOM  CULTURE

To learn more about IMGN, see www.mushroomsfmrc.com/gpage2.html, or write to FMRC to get complete information on this old and unique mushroom association…many valuable benefits.

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___  This is a "NON-RESTRICTED" Issue.  It contains no mushroom spore prints.

___  This is a "REPRINT"/"Photo Copy" Issue.  It may not contain prints or pictures.  Published by:          Florida Mycology Research Center (FMRC)

P.O. Box 18105, Pensacola, FL  32523-8105

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EDITORS:          You the reader

                   Over 7,000 IMGN Members 

          Marshall E. Deutsch:  Articles Taken from "The Bulletin Of

                                    The Boston Mycological Club” and other recent references                                

                                to fungi encountered during the editor’s quotidian activities

                  Cooking Editor: Robin Arnold

                  Chief Editor:  Stephen L. Peele, Curator FMRC

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The world’s only and longest running color Mushroom Journal (Since 1984) that comes with actual “Live Mushroom Spore Print Samples” affixed inside (held safe inside a small sealed plastic envelope).    

                                                 C O N T E N T S

Mushroom Journal Subscriptions and other Journal information.....................01

USE OF SPAWN RUN IN DIFFERENT SUBSTRATES FOR .......................02

      PRODUCTION OF OYSTER MUSHROOM (PLEUROTUS OSTREATUS)

Cooking With Mushrooms...............................................................................07

RedCap Posts Wrong Information at Shroomotopia.......................................08

A short quick lesson on Scientific Names for Shroomotopia..........................09

Mycology in the Media....................................................................................09

Shiitake Mushrooms Do Not Make Good Spores...........................................11

CULTURE  FLASK…….. Is this your last Issue on Subscription?..................11

FREE Mushroom Spore Print sample Coprinus comatus............................11

Mushroom Quiz..............................................................................................12

FREE TMC Subscriptions..............................................................................12

Color Photograph Psilocybe tampanensis sclerotia....................................13                                        

                                                  aa

Mushroom Journal Subscriptions:  If you would like to order a subscription to “THE MUSHROOM CULTURE”, you may send request and payment of $30.00 made out to FMRC, POB 18105, Pensacola, FL. 32523, for one year. 

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Know The Mushroom Laws In Your Area:  Some readers who receive this Journal live in areas where no mushroom laws exist.  Others, like those in the USA, must be aware of laws that forbid the possession and cultivation of mushrooms that contain controlled substances.  Psilocybe cubensis is an example of an illegal mushroom in the USA.  As articles are done on an International basis, always keep in mind the laws on these said type mushrooms in your own specific area.  Questions?  Check with the local law from a pay phone.

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                  #102 TMC April 2014    Page 01  Copyrighted Material

                                                   M A I L   C A L L

USE OF SPAWN RUN IN DIFFERENT SUBSTRATES FOR PRODUCTION OF OYSTER MUSHROOM (PLEUROTUS OSTREATUS)

  Department of Crop Science

    Faculty of Agriculture, University of Peradeniya

    Peradeniya 20400, Sri Lanka.

 Tel : 94-81-2395126,  2395111       Fax : 94-81-2395110                   e-mail: jpkirthi@pdn.ac.lk

_______________________________________________________________________________

02 January 2014

The Editor,

The Journal of Mushroom Cultivation,

Florida Mycology Research Center

FMRC, POB 18105,

Pensacola, FL 32523

U.S.A.

Dear Sir/Madam

Submission of a Research Paper for The Journal Of Mushroom Cultivation,

Herewith I am sending the research paper title ‘USE OF SPAWN RUN IN DIFFERENT SUBSTRATES FOR PRODUCTION OF OYSTER MUSHROOM (PLEUROTUS OSTREATUS), to be considered for the The Journal of Mushroom Cultivation

Thank you.

Yours sincerely, Dr.J.P.Kirthisinghe

USE OF SPAWN RUN IN DIFFERENT SUBSTRATES FOR PRODUCTION OF          OYSTER MUSHROOM (PLEUROTUS OSTREATUS)

J.P. Kirthisinghe and H.W.J.P.Amarasekara

Department of Crop Science

Faculty of Agriculture

 University of Peradeniya

Peradeniya 20400

Sri Lanka

email address:      jpkirthi@pdn.ac.lk

Mailing address: Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture,

 University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka

Contact nos:  0094 716662173, 0094 714446754

              #102 TMC April 2014    Page 02  Copyrighted Material

Use of spawn run in different substrates for production of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus)

J.P. Kirthisinghe and H.W.J.P.Amarasekara

Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture

 University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka

Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus spp.) is an attractive crop in Sri Lanka, as it enables to acquire substrate materials at low prices to conserve our environment by recycling wastes. Successful mushroom cultivation depends on reliable spawn and good substrate. Therefore, this experiment was carried out to find out the possibility of using the grower produce spawn run as the initial planting material and to identify the suitable substrate for production of oyster mushroom for the new method. The experiment was conducted for two seasons in the mushroom unit, University Experimental Station, Dodangolla. 5 g of spawn of oyster mushroom for treatments 1 and 3, and 10 g of spawn run for treatments 2 and 4 were used as the planting material. The saw dust substrate for treatments 1 and 2 and the paddy substrate for treatments 3 and 4 were used in polypropylene bags. There was no significant difference observed among treatments on  spawn runing and pin head formation. A significant difference was observed between the two substrates used in this experiment for the time taken for the first harvest and the total harvest. This study revealed that spawn and spawn run can be use as a planting material and they have no significant impact on duration of spawn runing and pin head formation. In contrast the paddy straw was a better substrate compared to saw dust, which had a great impact on growth and gave the first harvest within 29-30 days. The total harvest was also significantly higher in paddy straw substrate compared to saw dust. Since there was no significant yield difference between the spawn and spawn run treatments the growers will be able to save a rupee from each bag.

Key words: spawn, spawn run, saw dust, paddy straw

#102 TMC April 2014    Page 03  Copyrighted Material

 

Use of spawn run in different substrates for production of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus)

H. W. J. P. Amarasekara and J. P. Kirthisinghe

Department of Crop Science, Faculty of Agriculture

 University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka

INTRODUCTION

Oyster mushroom (Pleurotus spp.) is an attractive crop in Sri Lanka, as it enables to acquire substrate materials at low prices to conserve our environment by recycling wastes. Therefore, it is a commercially important, predominantly grown edible mushroom variety which widely practices in small-scale cultivation as a self-employment and a profitable agribusiness in Sri Lanka. Pleurotus is an efficient lignin degrading mushroom and can grow and yield well on different types of lignocellulolosic materials. Cultivation of oyster mushroom is very simple and has various advantages such as, it requires low space; low investment cost; easy to propagate; could take income in a short duration. Successful mushroom cultivation depends on three factors; reliable spawn, good substrate, conducive environment (Islam et al., 2009). Most of the growers in mid country buy the` reliable spawn from Department of Agriculture (DOA), Gannoruwa, Sri Lanka. Kirthisinghe and Amarasekera (2012) found that spawn run could be utilised as a planting material for the growers. Oyster mushroom growers in Sri Lanka use saw dust substrate mixture including rice bran, soya flour, or mung bean flour, CaCO3 and MgSO4. The information on the potential use of other locally available cost effective substrates are scarce (Rajapakse et al., 2007). Therefore, this experiment was carried out to find out the possibility of using the grower produce spawn run as the initial planting material and to identify the suitable cost effective substrate to reduce cost of production of oyster mushroom.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

The research was conducted in the mushroom unit, University Experimental Station, Dodangolla, Sri Lanka. The primary inoculum was prepared using fresh fruiting body of the mushroom through tissue culture method and multiplied by sub-culturing on sterilized PDA medium in petri dishes, incubated at 28 ˚C of room temperature. Paddy seeds were washed by teepol and boiled for 20 minutes until 25 percent of paddy seed become split. After cooling, 5 percent CaCO3 and 20 percent CaSO4 powder were mixed with boiled paddy seeds. 30 g of paddy seeds were filled into a polypropylene bag and sterilized for 20